Categories
hacks + do it yourself tech + the internet

Hidden recent items stack in 10.5

Hidden recent items stack in 10.5

Something that Apple doesn’t turn on by default in Leopard (10.5) – You can add a Recent Applications/Docs/Volumes stack to the Dock. Might be useful for some when you’re jumping around a lot.

“You can add a Recent Applications stack to the Dock. To do so, open Terminal and type this command:

defaults write com.apple.dock persistent-others -array-add '{ "tile-data" = { "list-type" = 1; }; "tile-type" = "recents-tile"; }'

After that, type killall Dock to restart the Dock and see your new folder. The only thing is that I haven’t found a way to have it show as a fan, it only shows in tile view. But it is already a nice trick. ”

If you don’t like it — just drag it off of your dock and it’s gone.


Categories
strangeness + randomness tech + the internet

Leopard and Alex

Leopard and Alex

One of my favorite new features of Leopard is the new professional voice they have included. “Alex”, is the new voice of Mac OS X. Before you read any further listen to this sample: Alex voice test A (mp3) or this one: Alex voice test B (mp3).

How it works: Voice synthesis on the Mac has been around for more than 20 years now, but outside of screenreading and special applications it’s never been a marquee feature (that is, if you don’t count Talking Moose — now once again available for OS X. Woot!). Even though the Macintalk and Speech Manager voices have improved a lot over time, the best of them still sound distressingly artificial.

Enter Alex, a dramatically more comprehensible voice that includes fine breath and pause control to enhance understandability, especially for high-speed reading; you can listen to a sample of Alex at this post. From the samples of Alex that I’ve heard, he compares favorably with high-end synthesis voices like AT&T’s Natural Voice and Cepstral. For anyone using VoiceOver or wanting to be able to track information while not watching the computer, Alex is a natural.” — TUAW.com post

One interesting thing is that the file that contains “the voice” is the largest single file installed on your Mac with Leopard, weighing in at 670 meg (/System/Library/Speech/Voices/Alex.SpeechVoice…).

Some more about it | Check Google